GRID Cheat Codes

Note that while these cheats may unlock cars that you want to own, the only one I would recommend is the Pagani Zonda R, for use in your first season.

Here’s why: much of the money you get from this game is through sponsors. When driving any of these cars, you will not get any sponsor money, as they are all ready “branded”, to use the GRID term.

That said, it’s pretty neat to unlock all of the drift cars as I find those events next to impossible, and some of you may find that having the muscle cars unlocked is a nifty trick.

Finally, if you want to race the car you’ve unlocked and have the money, you can actually purchase a new car, brand it, slap some sponsor logos on it, and you can race that to you heart’s content while being showered with oodles of dough in the hopes of signing some million dollar rookie.

Good luck!

TUN58396
– All drift cars

MUS59279

– All muscle cars

F93857372

– Buchbinder 320si Livery

M38572343

– Free Pagani Zonda R

P47203845

– Play.com Livery

G29782655

– Unlock a BMW 320si for Use in Grid World and Raceday. Locked to Gamestation Livery

eCamperVanHire

– Unlock vans and you can race with them.Really fun.

CONTEST – Call of Duty: World at War Beta Code

OK here goes,

I have a Call of Duty: WaW beta code that I don’t need.

I’m going to do a random draw from the first 25 responses, then give it away!

So far, the beta is awesome. This isn’t CoD4, but pretty darn good just the same.

Call of Duty: World at War Beta

Just so you guys know I’m not pulling your legs, here’s a pic of the email I got, as well as the text from the email:

Xbox 360 Multiplayer Code!

Thank you for registering on CallofDuty.com and welcome to the Call of Duty: World at War Xbox 360™ Multiplayer Beta*!

Here is your unique Xbox 360 multiplayer code:
XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX

In order to participate in the Xbox 360 Demo:

1. Receive your Xbox Live® Marketplace Token (above) and write it down.
You will not be able to download the Beta without it
2. Use your laptop for gaming to log into Xbox Live with your gamer profile
3. Access Xbox Live Marketplace through the Xbox 360™ Dashboard
4. Click Redeem Code
5. Enter your Xbox Live Marketplace Token when prompted
6. Start the download
7. Join the fight!

Download the instruction manual (432 kb PDF).

And remember, we want to hear from you! Please come back to CallofDuty.com and give us your feedback, what you like and what you’d change to make Call of Duty: World at War the best experience possible!

* The PC Beta is coming up next! Stay close to CallofDuty.com and check your email for details soon to come!

Installing WordPress MU on a Dreamhost Server

Blandname is currently hosted with DreamHost, and we’ve been here for years. It’s cheap, offers lots of goodies, and one-click installs allow us to easily install and test web-based software. Not to mention that they also support Ruby on Rails, and give you SSH access and the ability to run a Jabber server as well as unlimited MySQL databases. If you are wanting to host your own website then choose a UKservers.

You’ve also probably gathered that blandname is currently running WordPress. Dreamhost Circulo Marketing has had a one-click install for WordPress just like ipage has for a while now, and since it was handy at the time, we went for it.

But things change, and one-click installs often are not enough to satisfy most webmasters, which is how we got where we are today. Since my goal with blandname is to create another multiuser blog similar to what has already been running for years at yottabite, but instead of having one big weblog, we’d like to have multiple subdomains like string.blandname.com, which WordPress MU allows you to accomplish, automatically.

Unfortunately DreamHost doesn’t support WordPress MU‘s subdomains by default yet (you can always send them an email), but we can still get away with subfolders, which is more than good enough for a test.

This guide will require familiarity with DreamHost’s control panel, as well as common Bash shell commands as we will be using SSH.

The first step is to make a test domain for you WordPress MU install. In my case, I navigated to the “Domains” section of the left-hand menu, then to the “Manage Domains” section of the DreamHost panel, and created the new subdomain test.blandname.com. You’ll want to make sure to select PHP5, and enable extra security. This typically takes about 10 minutes to complete, but we still have the database to add, so let’s get to that at the same time.

In the “goodies” section of the DreamHost control panel, select “Manage MySQL”. The default view is to set up a new MySQL database, which is what we’re going to do. Create a unique database name, the subdomain you would like it to use, as well as the data base username and password. Make sure to keep note of all of these settings as we will need them when installing WPMU.

DreamHost will have by now created a folder in your SSH root that will allow you to place files there and start some of the work while we wait for the subdomain to be created and propagate. Login to your server using SSH (you’ll need to use either your DreamHost hostname here or another web address for now – you can use the WordPress Mu domain later). Now we’ll navigate to the new subdirectory that was created when we setup the new subdomain by typing: cd test.blandname.com Change the folder name to whatever is pertinent in this case.

Now that we’re in the correct folder, we’ll grab the latest using the always-handy WGET. Here’s the code:

wget http://mu.wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

gunzip latest.tar.gz

tar -xvf latest.tar

cd wordpressmu-1.0 (this will probably change, ls -al will tell you the dirname)

cp -rf * /home/YOURUSERNAME/test.yourdomain.com/

cd ..

rm -rf wordpressmu-1.0/

Now we’ve got a clean directory structure in the root of our test domain, and we’re set to go ahead with the WordPress MU installation.

By now the subdomain has probably propagated because DreamHost is getting faster and faster, so using your web browser, navigate to test.yourdomain.com

Next you’ll want to retrieve the soiled napkin, SubEthaEdit file or whatever else it was that you used to jot down the database settings, and plop them in here. They are very straightforward, and this is typically the most problematic so check them twice but have no fear: if you mess up WP MU will tell you, and you can retrieve the settings from the “Manage MySQL” section in the DreamHost web control panel.

The rest is quite simple: you’ll be met with a typical WordPress installation page, but instead it’s for WorPress MU. The first question that needs to be asked is whether or not WordPress MU users will be using subdomains or subfolders of the root WPMU installation. As previously stated, DreamHost currently does not support subdomains by default (I’ve put in a request, here’s hoping), so we’ll select subfolders here. WP MU will have already placed the domain name you will be using in the yellow textfield, but if you had decided to use subfolders instead of the webroot, you’ll want to specify that here as this will affect all links as well as your RSS feeds.

Lastly, we’ll want to name our multi-user WordPress MU blog, and specify the email address that you will use for things like spam reports, and replies to your comments on the parent blog.

Click on that small “submit” button, and let’s see what happens!

Hopefully on the next screen you’ll see this message:

Creating Database Config File: DONE
Congrats! Your WPMU site has been set up and you have been sent details of your login and password in an email.

Click on the link provided, and get with customization, as we’re all done.

Ruby on Rails installed by default in Leopard

This is more of a teaser, but my dream has come true! Ruby on Rails is now installed by default on Apple Mac OS X 10.5 Beta (Leopard WWDC edition). Getting it up and running is really a snap.

Here’s the quick and dirty way to make a sample Rails environment and start the server.

Firstly, open the Terminal application. You know the scary black window with white text. Well actually it could even be white with black text – your mileage may vary (mine is black with green, for example).

Anyway, we’re wasting time – this is quick and dirty right? Otherwise I would be talking about chunky bacon.

In Terminal, type:

rails example

You’ll be met with a nice list of scrolling lines and when it’s done your “example” Rails application will have been initialised.

And that’s pretty well it!

Moving on, we want to see something tangible to prove to ourselves just how flippin’ impressive this really is, and why you knew when you saw that Apple Developper Connection article about Rails you knew good things were to come.

In Terminal, once more, sweating profusely now, we type:

cd example

ruby script/server

This runs the server for us. Once it has been set up, you can safely minimize the Terminal, and fire up Safari, Firefox, Camino, iCab, heck even Internet Explorer. We’re navigating ourselves to: 127.0.0.1:3000

Here’s what we find there (click the thumbnail to enlarge the screenshot):

Ruby on Rails 1.1.2 running on OS X Leopard

The nitty-gritty (no dirt band):

  • Ruby version – 1.8.4
  • RubyGems Version – 0.9.0
  • Rails version – 1.1.2
  • Active Record version – 1.14.2
  • Action Pack version – 1.12.1
  • Action Web Service version – 1.1.2
  • Action Mailer Version – 1.2.1
  • Active Support version – 1.3.1

It’s set up in a development environment by default (where you want it), using the sqlite3 database adapter (pretty typical).

Next time we’ll show you how to update these and run irb. Until then feel free to vote in our poll and support us!

Ruby and FTP

I came across a great tip that should help anyone trying to make an FTP client in Ruby. Basically it seems the Net/FTP library is attempting reverse lookups of addresses you try to connect to (which is in itself fine, but perhaps unnecessary). The problem arises because the reverse lookup is called each time a new file transfer is initiated. http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/scat.rb/ruby/ruby-talk/112801

Here’s the resolution I found in the japanese forum:

BasicSocket.do_not_reverse_lookup = true

Make A Solaris 10 DVD Image On Windows

Firstly, grab all of the image files from Sun

You’ll need a Sun ID, and you don’t need to use the Java download helper, but if you’re on a slow connection it will certainly help (if anything, it helps by queuing your downloads).

Once all of the files have been downloaded, you will need to extract them. I use WinRAR to do this, but the choice is yours.

Navigate to the folder you have downloaded the files to. Select all of the files, either by dragging a selection box, or by ctrl-clicking, or shift-clicking. Right-click, then click on “extract files here”. Wait a while (this is a full DVD image).

Once this process has completed we will need to concatenate the files together.

The next step is not required, but I find it will help with everyday computing as well so I have included it.

You’ll need to somehow run a command in the folder that you have all of the Solaris files in. I use the Microsoft PowerToy to do that. Download and install it.

(Or you can use many other ways to do the same thing if you wish – the choice is yours)

Then find the folder you have downloaded the files to and right-click it. You will be offered the option to “Run Program” from the context menu. Click that button and paste the following into the resulting window.

copy /b
"sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-a"
+"sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-b"
+"sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-c"
+"sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-d"
+"sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-e"
sol-10-GA-x86-dvd.iso

you’ll see (if your files are on the drive “D” and you use Windows XP):

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
D:\sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-a
D:\sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-b
D:\sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-c
D:\sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-d
D:\sol-10-u1-ga-x86-dvd-iso-e
1 file(s) copied.

Voila! You can now burn the image using free software like IMGBurn, or commercial such as Nero, Roxio EasyCD, or Cheetah.

Dreamhost Stats Rewriting and Typo with .htaccess

If you run Ruby on Rails apps, or a Typo installation on Dreamhost, you may have noticed that you cannot access your stats page. Here’s the code that will get it running, quick and dirty, and have you poring over stats for HOURS!

You’ll want to login to your server using SSH, then edit the .htaccess file in your public folder, from within your home directory. Here’s how I did it as an example:

# pico /ruby.doesrails.com/public/.htacess

Cut and paste the following code:

# This is the stats rewrite rule for use with Dreamhost

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/stats/(.*)$ [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/failed_auth.html$
RewriteRule ^.*$ - [L]

(select the code, use CTRL+C on windows, or APPLE+C on a Mac, then to paste use SHIFT+INSERT on most SSH clients, or simply right-click and select paste from the menu)

You can put this anywhere in the .htacess file and it should work, as long as it is after the

RewriteEngine On

rule that already exists.