RSync Files to a Unix/BSD Backup Device from your Mac Laptop

My photo-taking workflow while on vacation usually involves taking a lot of photos daily, dumping them to a laptop, processing, then backing them up once I have returned home.
Previously, I accomplished this manually using BeyondCompare for Windows, as that would run on Windows Home Server.
Since moving to ZFS-based storage, however, this is no longer an option as BeyondCompare only has a Linux client (nothing for Unix/BSD).
There are other ways to get around this:

  • SSHFS and Meld – Complicated, somewhat bloated, but great BeyondCompare alternative
  • *Commander Utilities – Midnight Commander derivatives can accomplish similar tasks using the ctrl+x,d shortcut
  • Rsync – typically installed by default, easy to script

I chose Rsync as I wanted something more automated, but I do find myself using Midnight Commander from time-to-time to simply “get things done” when syncing files other than my images.

Here’s how I did it:

rsync -a -e ssh /volumes/PICTURES/ 'username@mymac:/Volumes/BIGRAID/'

Let’s break this down into smaller pieces:

rsync – this is the command that will do our heavy lifting and file comparison

-a – archive mode

-e – specify an RSH replacement

ssh  – use SSH

/volumes/PICTURES/ – this specifies the “Volumes” folder on my Mac, and the “PICTURES” drive within it. Replace this with the location of your items to backup

 – note the use of single quotes here. We’re using these in case there are spaces in the folder names, and we could have done the same above.

username@mymac – We’re logging on to the host “mymac” with the username “username”. You’ll probably want to change these. I use a hostname here, but you could just as easily use an IP address if you use static IP addresses.

:/volumes/BIGRAID/ – the colon denotes a subfolder on the server we are backing up to, and /volumes/BIGRAID in this case refers to a ZFS pool called “BIGRAID”.

Do you have a similar backup strategy for BSD/Unix targets that you would like to share?

Civilization 5 Tactics and Strategies

This post will outline and detail strategies, tips, tricks, cheats and tactics for Sid Meier’s Civilization V (Civ5/CivV). Call it an FAQ of sorts.

Let’s get on with it, shall we?

Some quick observations:

  • Open borders allows you to surround an enemy, then attack. This works wonders later on.
  • The trebuchet seems a bit overpowered, and is definitely the best way to attack cities.
  • The easiest way I know of to skip the first intro movie is to simply rename “Civ5_Opening_Movie_en_US.wmv” to something else.
  • Alternatively, edit the “usersettings.ini” file found in “My Documents\My Games\Sid Meiers Civilization 5\”. Make sure to change “SkipIntroVideo=0” to “=1” on line 15.
  • For a copy of the English manual for Civ5, head here
  • How to turn on workers automatically keeping improvements
    In the My Documents folder go to the Civ V folder and then look for the “usersettings.ini” file.

    There is a setting called AutoWorkersDontReplace. Change the value from 0 to 1.

Call of Duty 4 Enemy Intel Guide

I must say that I’ve been very impressed with the skyrocketing growth of Mahalo lately.

I was going to make a nice big guide with screenshots and the whole 9 yards about all of the Enemy Intels in Call of Duty 4, but it looks like Mahalo beat me to it, but not only that, they have videos of every enemy intel in all of CoD4!

At any rate, click here to follow along with the Call of Duty 4 Enemy Intel videos.