Windows Home Server in VMware Fusion 3

I set off on a quest to get the home backup / media server / remote access solution Windows Home Server with Power Pack 3 running inside of VMware Fusion 3 running on top of Apple OSX Snow Leopard (10.6).

Why, you ask? Simply because I thought I could… A little while after downloading the Windows Home Server trial, it became apparent that there was no selection for this operating system. No matter, I thought, it’s based on Windows Server 2003, so I should simply be able to select that, right? Unfortunately not that easy. First, the hard disk type selected by default by VMware Fusion is SCSI. Without a driver disk (virtual floppy), you’ll have no luck. Also, the amount of memory available doesn’t meet the Windows Home Server requirements.

My method?

Try these settings:

– Windows Server 2003 Web Server

– No “easy install” settings

– 512MB RAM

– Remove the default HDD

– Add an 80GB IDE HDD

– Make sure the ISO is mounted

Things seem to be working at this point.

Hope this helps someone, I trawled Google and the Fusion forums with no luck.

g4u and Virtualization

A quick note about g4u – g4u (Ghost for you) is a hard disk imaging tool similar to Norton Ghost, but without the cost. g4u allows you to image hard disks to both files and physical media. This can be accomplished within a physical machine, a virtual machine, or by using an FTP server on either of the two.

Right Click Using Your Keyboard (Windows)

Here’s a quick tip:

You can right-click just as if you were using a mouse, but without using your mouse, using the shift and F10 keys together.

For example, if you’d like to extract a .RAR in a directory, simply press END, cursor up, then shift+F10 and extract! Voila! Easy as pie extract in every folder in windows with 4 keystrokes.

More tips coming soon as the new year kicks off to a good start folks!

GRID Cheat Codes

Note that while these cheats may unlock cars that you want to own, the only one I would recommend is the Pagani Zonda R, for use in your first season.

Here’s why: much of the money you get from this game is through sponsors. When driving any of these cars, you will not get any sponsor money, as they are all ready “branded”, to use the GRID term.

That said, it’s pretty neat to unlock all of the drift cars as I find those events next to impossible, and some of you may find that having the muscle cars unlocked is a nifty trick.

Finally, if you want to race the car you’ve unlocked and have the money, you can actually purchase a new car, brand it, slap some sponsor logos on it, and you can race that to you heart’s content while being showered with oodles of dough in the hopes of signing some million dollar rookie.

Good luck!

TUN58396
– All drift cars

MUS59279

– All muscle cars

F93857372

– Buchbinder 320si Livery

M38572343

– Free Pagani Zonda R

P47203845

– Play.com Livery

G29782655

– Unlock a BMW 320si for Use in Grid World and Raceday. Locked to Gamestation Livery

eCamperVanHire

– Unlock vans and you can race with them.Really fun.

You have not chosen to trust Equifax Secure Global eBusiness CA-1

Though the Citrix client comes as part of the default install on SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop, unfortunately the root certificate is not installed for the Citrix ICA client, and furthermore requires an extension that is slightly different than the certificate vendor’s version.

When attempting to access a Citrix secure web gateway on SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop, you’ll get the following error: You have not chosen to trust “Equifax Secure Global eBusiness CA-1”
Here goes:
Install the root certificate by opening a root x terminal session:

wget http://www.geotrust.com/resources/root_certificates/certificates/Equifax_Secure_Certificate_Authority_DER.cer && cp Equifax_Secure_Certificate_Authority_DER.cer /usr/lib/ICAClient/keystore/cacerts/Equifax_Secure_Certificate_Authority_DER.crt && exit

Browse to your Citrix web gateway again and login, then run an application.

Presto!

(PARDON THE LINEWRAP, BUT THIS ONE-LINER IS WORTH IT)

CONTEST – Call of Duty: World at War Beta Code

OK here goes,

I have a Call of Duty: WaW beta code that I don’t need.

I’m going to do a random draw from the first 25 responses, then give it away!

So far, the beta is awesome. This isn’t CoD4, but pretty darn good just the same.

Call of Duty: World at War Beta

Just so you guys know I’m not pulling your legs, here’s a pic of the email I got, as well as the text from the email:

Xbox 360 Multiplayer Code!

Thank you for registering on CallofDuty.com and welcome to the Call of Duty: World at War Xbox 360™ Multiplayer Beta*!

Here is your unique Xbox 360 multiplayer code:
XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX

In order to participate in the Xbox 360 Demo:

1. Receive your Xbox Live® Marketplace Token (above) and write it down.
You will not be able to download the Beta without it
2. Use your laptop for gaming to log into Xbox Live with your gamer profile
3. Access Xbox Live Marketplace through the Xbox 360™ Dashboard
4. Click Redeem Code
5. Enter your Xbox Live Marketplace Token when prompted
6. Start the download
7. Join the fight!

Download the instruction manual (432 kb PDF).

And remember, we want to hear from you! Please come back to CallofDuty.com and give us your feedback, what you like and what you’d change to make Call of Duty: World at War the best experience possible!

* The PC Beta is coming up next! Stay close to CallofDuty.com and check your email for details soon to come!

Songbird Beta Released (finally)!

We’re excited to announce that Songbird is now in public Beta! This update to Songbird includes a new default look and feel, several new features, performance gains, improvements to stability and additional playback capabilities.
New Features
A New Look
We’ve completely redesigned Songbird to make it simpler and more intuitive. We’ve improved drag-and-drop throughout the application and worked to optimize music management vs. web browsing experiences.
Smart Playlists
Create dynamic playlists that automatically update based on criteria you set.
Concert Tickets
Discover upcoming shows in your area based on the artists in your library. Event listings powered by Songkick.
Last.fm Scrobbling
Integrated Last.fm support allows you to scrobble, love, and ban your tracks.
Album Artwork
Display the currently playing track’s album art and write new artwork back to the file.
Note: If you are upgrading from an older version of Songbird, be sure to get the Concerts and Last.fm add-ons so you can enjoy all the new features we’re talking about!
Performance Enhancements
A lot of users have asked us to devote cycles to focusing on performance and stability improvements. We made substantial investments in this release and will continue to dedicate much of our next release to focusing on this area. In this release we:

 

  • Started our migration towards adopting GStreamer as our media core on all platforms. Starting with this release, GStreamer handles playback of FLAC files. In our next release, GStreamer will become our default media core and handle all codec playback and enable additional functionality, such as gapless playback.
  • Improved startup performance. Launching Songbird is now significantly faster than before, in some cases by several orders of magnitude.
  • Reduced memory usage on Windows and Linux by enabling jemalloc as Songbird’s memory allocator.
  • Reduced the time it takes to import media and scan metadata. On all platforms reading metadata is now twice as fast.
  • Improved search results and sort order by ignoring diacritics (like á, ö etc).

For Developers

Early Feedback on 0.7
“A marked improvement over the last release” – Jason Kincaid – TechCrunch
“Songbird’s new UI is also a major improvement” – Sarah Perez – ReadWriteWeb
What’s Next
As we march towards a 1.0 release, our goal is to improve existing features while continuing to focus on performance gains and stability issues. Stay tuned to the blog to keep up to date, or if you like to live dangerously check out one of our nightly builds and see the progress for yourself!

Install Mac OS X Leopard on a G4 800mhz Quicksilver

If you have an old G4 sitting around that’s at the 800mhz mark, you probably should try installing Leopard, because most people agree it actually runs FASTER than Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger. Weird, huh? I guess they’ve optimized the code pretty well.
However, when you try to install the operating system, you are warned that Leopard cannot be installed on your G4. There are a few reasons for this:
1) Leopard requires 512MB of RAM – you have RAM, right?
2) Leopard requires over 867mhz processor

We can fix number 1 by simply getting more RAM. I find Craigslist to be of great use here. Number two is a bit more difficult as G4 processor upgrades are ridiculously expensive once you consider the cost of a Mac Mini, and also requires a bit of tech savvy under the hood as you’d be swapping CPUs.
Not to worry, though. Here’s a way to convince OpenFirmware that your CPU is 867mhz, and allow the installer to boot, install, and get you off and running:
Boot into Open Firmware, I have covered this extensively here:
Once in OpenFirmware, issue the following commands (for single CPU):
dev /cpus/PowerPC,G4@0
d# 867000000 encode-int " clock-frequency" property
boot cd:,\\:tbxi

For dual CPU:
dev /cpus/PowerPC,G4@0
d# 867000000 encode-int " clock-frequency" property
dev /cpus/PowerPC,G4@1
d# 867000000 encode-int " clock-frequency" property
boot cd:,\\:tbxi

Note that all we are doing is over-writing the CPU clock-frequency (speed) property for each CPU installed, at boot time.
Also, if you need to boot another device, try:
printenv boot-device
This will return a list of boot devices to use when booting the installer. I used this in order to boot a Firewire device that had had a disc image (DMG) restored to it, making things a bit easy and faster.

Good luck!

How do I install .kext files?

I hear this a lot, and I myself have also gone looking for it…

So without  further ado, here is the script that will install kext files for you – be warned – you’ll need to know how to get the kext file in the first place, as well as the filename.

Easy right?

Let’s get started.

Open the Terminal application by going to Applications / Utilities / Terminal.app – you will see it in the Utilities folder – it looks like a command prompt.

Once terminal has launched, type in the following command:

sudo -s

Enter the root or first user password that you inputted during the setup process.

This tells it to run any other commands after this one as the root or superuser account, allowing you to edit files you normally would not have permission to edit.

Here’s an example using IOATAFamily.kext, a popular ATA driver. You’ll want to replace this by your own driver name. Also, you’ll want to make sure the file is unzipped, and sitting on your desktop. Oh one more thing, you’ll want to edit YOURUSERNAME with… your username 🙂

mv /Users/(YOUR USERNAME)/Desktop/IOATAFamily.kext /System/Library/Extensions
chmod -R 755 /System/Library/Extensions/IOATAFamily.kext
sudo chown -R root:wheel /System/Library/Extensions/IOATAFamily.kext
cd /System/Library/Extensions
rm -rf Extensions.mkext
rm -rf Extensions.kextcache

Hope that helps!